At present, Melfort, SK has a population of 5,992 people. Overall, the population of Melfort, SK is growing at a rate of 0.52% per year over the past 15 years from 2001 to 2016. In the last two census, its populations grew by 416 people, an average growth rate of 1.49% per year from 2011 to 2016.

Population is the sum of births plus in-migration, and it signifies the total market size possible in the area. This is an important metric for economic developers to measure their economic health and investment attraction. Businesses also use this as a metric for market size when evaluating startup, expansion or relocation decisions.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: February 2017

Overall, women outnumber men by 305 people. The 0 to 4 years old age cohort exhibits the largest discrepancy with a difference of 25 people between the sexes. Furthermore, majority of the population is between the ages 5 to 9 years old, comprising 7.28 per cent of the population.

Age-sex charts emphasize the gap between the numbers of males and females at a specific age group. It also illustrates the age and gender trends across all age and gender groupings. A chart skewed heavily to the left describes a very young population while a chart skewed heavily to the right illustrates an aging population.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: May 2017

The largest population of Melfort, SK is the age group between 5 and 9 years old, and the least populated age group is between 80 and 84 years old. 58.72% of the population are in the working age group between 15 to 64 years old, while 32.67% make up the younger population which will be a part of labour force in less than 2 decades.

Ages chart illustrates the age and gender trends across all age and gender groupings. A chart where the the covered area is primarily on the right describes a very young population while a chart where the the covered area is primarily on the left illustrates an aging population.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: April 2017

Majority of the population are married, making up 50.31 per cent of the population. Having a predominantly married population is highy beneficial to Melfort, SK as married couples usually bring in larger incomes, higher net worth and gains on average. They also help boost the community's liveliness and labour force, as they are most likely to bear children and create the best economic conditions for them. Furthermore, this group also spends more compared to most of their counterparts.

The marital status is another term for civil status, or person's current relationship with a partner.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: April 2017

With a population at 5,992 people, most inhabitants at Melfort, SK are above the low income cut-off, or the income a person must earn to be considered to be part of the low income group. Majority are also above the 2,016 national median income of $62,144 per year.

The household incomes chart shows how many household fall in each of the income brackets specified by Statistics Canada.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: September 2017

The largest aboriginal population are that of the First Nations, making up 56.43 per cent of the total aboriginal population. At 305 people, the second largest Aboriginal population is the Metis.

The aboriginal populations chart shows the composition of the aboriginal population in a municipality.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: October 2017

The largest visible minority population are that of the Filipino, making up 71.95 per cent of the total visible minority population. The second largest group are the Black, making up 40 people.Following Black is Korean that is 7.32 per cent of the visible minority population.

Number of people belonging to a visible minority group as defined by the Employment Equity Act and, if so, the visible minority group to which the person belongs. The Employment Equity Act defines visible minorities as 'persons, other than Aboriginal peoples, who are non-Caucasian in race or non-white in colour.' The visible minority population consists mainly of the following groups: South Asian, Chinese, Black, Filipino, Latin American, Arab, Southeast Asian, West Asian, Korean and Japanese.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: October 2017

Melfort, SK has a median age of 41 years old.

The median age indicates the age separating the population group into two halves of equal size.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: February 2017

Majority of the population speaks English only, making up 98.03 per cent of the population.

This chart shows how many individuals can carry a conversation in English only, in French only, in both English and French, or in neither English nor French.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: December 2017

In Melfort, SK, the median household income is $62,144 per year. The median household income in Melfort, SK is lower than the national household median income in 2015.

The median income indicates the income bracket separating the income earners into two halves of equal size.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: September 2017

The largest influx of immigrants to Canada was 2011 to 2016, where 210 people surveyed called Canada their new home.

Periods of migration shows how many people who entered Canada are currently residing in Melfort, SK.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: December 2017

Overall, the employment rate in Melfort, SK is growing at a rate of 0.08% per year over the past 15 years from 2001 to 2016. In the last two census, its employment rates declined by 2.5%, an average decline rate of 0.5% per year from 2011 to 2016. Further decrease in employment rates signals a negative economic condition in the community with job seekers not finding employment.

The employment rate chart shows the percentage of people of working age who are employed for each of the past three census years.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: November 2017

Overall, the participation rate in Melfort, SK is growing at a rate of 0.17% per year over the past 15 years from 2001 to 2016. In the last two census, its participation rates declined by 2.0%, an average growth rate of -0.4% per year from 2011 to 2016. A decrease in participation rate means the proportion of the working population in Melfort, SK is lower than in the past.

The participation rates chart shows the percentage of people who are either employed or are actively looking for work. A growing participation rate signals more people coming into the labour force whether younger people looking for first jobs, people of working age switching careers or jobs, or people re-entering the job market after job disruptions. Migration can significantly affect this economic metric.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: November 2017

Overall, the unemployment rate in Melfort, SK is growing at a rate of 0.12% per year over the past 15 years from 2001 to 2016. In the last two census, its unemployment rates grew by 0.9%, an average growth rate of 0.18% per year from 2011 to 2016. A growing unemployment rate signals that there is a higher level of competition between job applicants so obtaining a job becomes more difficult.

The unemployment rate chart shows the number of unemployed workers and people searching for a paid job expressed as a percentage of the labour force. An increasing unemployment rate signals an “employer’s market” where there are more job seekers compared to the number of jobs available.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: November 2017

Umbrellas and raincoats are most handy in the month of July when it rains an average of 76 mm. This is 26.37% of the annual rain experienced in Melfort, SK. The month of June is also rainy with an average rainfall of 54.3 mm. Following June is August, when 52.4 mm is the average rainfall.

The average rainfall chart shows the average amount of total rainfall, or amount of all liquid precipitation in millimetres (mm) such as rain, drizzle, freezing rain, and hail, observed at the location for each month of the specified year. Precipitation is measured using vertical depth of water (or water equivalent in the case of solid forms) which reaches the ground during a stated period.

Environment CanadaLast Updated: December 2019

Wrap up in layers in the month of December when snow builds up tp an average of 17.5 centimetres. This is 16.53% of the annual snowfall experienced in Melfort, SK. The month of March is also snowy with an average snowfall of 16.0 cm. Following March is November, when 15.0 cm is the average snowfall.

The average snowfalls chart shows the average amount of snow an area gets in centimetres.

Environment CanadaLast Updated: November 2018

It is coldest in Melfort, SK in January when temperature drops to -22.0 °C and warmest in the month of July when it hits 23.6 °C. It will be a good idea to always check temperatures and the weather around August when temperatures are more fickle that it changed by 13.5 °C in the same month in 2016. Temperatures are most stable in Melfort, SK in the month of November.

The average temperature chart illustrates the range of recorded temperature for each month of the specified year. The temperature of the air in degrees Celsius (°C).

Environment CanadaLast Updated: December 2019

46.69 per cent, which is majority of homes in Melfort, SK, were constructed between 1961 to 1980. Building and home construction was also brisk before 1960, where 540 homes were built. In between 1981 to 1990, 300 of homes were built too.

Periods of construction chart illustrates the number of buildings or dwellings constructed for each time period.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: September 2017

Majority of commuters in Melfort, SK leave their homes from 7:00am to 7:59am, saying that it's enough time to get to work. The second most popular time to head to work, with 25.88% of respondents, is from 8:00am to 8:59am. However, 355 of commuters still prefer to leave from 6:00am to 6:59am.

This chart display the most common time intervals workers leave to start commuting to work.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: December 2017

Most people in Melfort, SK have have completed a high school education. With 1,325 people, it is what most people in Melfort, SK completed. Coming in second, 28.45% of inhabitants say they have not completed any certificate. The third largest group are people who have completed a university degree, with 710 people responding.

Educational attainment refers to the highest degree of education an individual has completed, and this chart shows the number of residents for each level of education.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: November 2017

36.96%, which is majority of homes in Melfort, SK, have 4 or more bedrooms. Homes with three bedrooms are also very popular, with 710 homes built with this number of bedrooms. The third largest category of homes according to number of bedrooms are two bedrooms representing 21.21 per cent of dwellings.

Dwellings by number of bedrooms chart illustrates the most popular types of homes based of bedroom count.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: September 2017

Majority of commuters, around 2,080 respondents in Melfort, SK, are carpooling in a private car, truck, or van to go to work. Moreover, 12.04% of respondents say that they prefer walking. The third most popular means of transportation is driving alone in a private car, truck, or van with 150 commuters preferring it.

The modes of transportation chart illustrates residents' most popular choices when it comes to getting around the area.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: April 2017

Most are in Business, Management & Public Administration with 515 people practicing it in Melfort, SK. Health & related fields is another popular field of expertise, as 20.36% of inhabitants are involved in it. The third group are those who are in Engineering & related fields, with 410 people responding that it is their line of work. STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) is expected to be a growing industry, however, Department of Finance confirms that Canada is lagging behind other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries in terms of STEM graduates. Melfort, SK has 490 people or 22.17% of workers in STEM industries.

The major field of study chart shows the predominant disciplines or areas of learning or training of a person's highest completed postsecondary certificate, diploma or degree classified by Statistics Canada.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: November 2017

Majority of the population, which is around 88.79% of residents received their schooling from Canada. Another country where most residents received their schooling is the Philippines, making up 130 people. At 3.36 per cent, those who received their education from another country not listed here is the third largest group.

The location of studies chart shows the countries where residents received their schooling. It reflects the variety of educational background of a municipality's population.

Statistics Canada. 2016 Census.Last Updated: December 2017

The business sizes chart shows the distribution of businesses according to the number of employees they employ. Definitions of what fall under a small, medium, or large business varies per country. However, in North America, small businesses are generally referred to have fewer than 100 employees, medium-sized businesses employing anywhere from 100 to 500 employees. Anywhere above 500 employees falls under large enterprises. The chart helps understand the profile of businesses in the region. Having a huge portion of businesses with a small workforce generally means that the municipality is more or less diversified, and that small and medium-sized enterprises have a huge influence on the municipality’s economy.

Statistics Canada. Business Register.Last Updated: February 2020

Description
In response to large flood events, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), for the provision of emergency geomatics services, may be activated by Canada’s emergency management protocols. As new satellite imagery becomes available, NRCan will extract flood extent polygons and update the dataset in near real time (4 hours). This item contains the flood products generated in the past year. For any data relating to previous years, please refer to the Floods in Canada – Archive entry. Please note that the web mapping service may not display data if flood polygons have not been published by the EGS for the current year. The flood products generated are validated on a best effort basis. Various factors may affect the quality of the flood polygons. These factors include, but are not limited to, sensor type, image resolution, cloud cover or limitations of the flood polygon extraction method. In this layer, where possible, a symbology is applied to the flood polygons based on the underlying land use classification, or is simply unclassified and shows the raw flood extent. When using Web mapping services, to display a specific product, filter by date (UTC Date) and area of interest (AOI). Also, a link to download each product directly from the FTP site is available in the Resources section. This prepackaged and compressed product contains a Shape file, a PDF file and a KMZ file. Disclaimer : Emergency response authorities are the primary users of these satellite-derived open water flood extent map products. These products are generated to provide analysis and emergency response situational awareness and to facilitate decision-making during major flood events. The open water flood extent products are generated rapidly and limited time is available for editing and validation. The flood products reflect the open water flood conditions at the date/time of acquisition. While efforts are made to produce high quality products, near-real time products may contain errors due to the limited time available for vector editing and validation. Please note that current algorithms do not map flooded areas under the forest canopy and are not optimized for urban flood mapping. Limitation of Liability : Accordingly, the information contained on this website is provided on an “as is” basis and Natural Resources Canada makes no representations or warranties respecting the information, either expressed or implied, arising by law or otherwise, including but not limited to, effectiveness, completeness, accuracy or fitness for a particular purpose. Natural Resources Canada does not assume any liability in respect of any damage or loss based on the use of this website. In no event shall Natural Resources Canada be liable in any way for any direct, indirect, special, incidental, consequential, or other damages based on any use of this website or any other website to which this site is linked, including, without limitation, any lost profits or revenue or business interruption. Parent Collection:- Floods in Canada - Cartographic Product Collection

Visit Floods in Canada - Current Year for more information, formats, contacts and metadata.


Layers
Natural Events in Canada - Floods 2006-2011 in gl and sl ab
Find Locations in Natural Events in Canada - Floods
Natural Events in Canada - Floods
Active Floods in Canada
Floods in Canada - Current Year
Floods in Canada - Archive

Floods in Canada (04/03/2011 - 04/03/2020)

Agroclimate Interactive Maps, Statistics Canada, Government of Canada

About Agroclimate Interactive Maps
This application allows you to view current and historic maps of agroclimate conditions in Canada.

The AAFC Agroclimate data can be acquired from:

Precipitation
Accumulated
Percent of Average
Departure from Average
Percentiles
Temperature
Maximum
Minimum
Crop (Corn) Heat Units
Growing Degree Days
To view maps and other products produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, please visit our Geospatial Products

If you have questions or feedback, please email the Agri-Geomatics Service at Agri-Geomatics-Agrog@agr.gc.ca.

Revier Conditions that I retrieved from Government of Manitoba, Could be useful for those areas near the border, I could not find the data for SK.

Natural Events in Canada (Updated 12/17/13)

Description
Flood extent polygons representing active floods (last three days) throughout Canada as monitored by Natural Resources Canada using satellite imagery for emergency response. In response to large flood events, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), for the provision of emergency geomatics services, may be activated by Canada’s emergency management protocols. As new satellite imagery becomes available, NRCan will extract flood extent polygons and update the dataset in near real time (4 hours). This item contains the latest flood products generated in the past three days. For any data older than 72 hours, please refer to the Floods in Canada - Current Year entry. For this reason note that the web mapping service may not display data if flood polygons have not been published by the EGS in the past three days. The flood products generated are validated on a best effort basis. Various factors may affect the quality of the flood polygons. These factors include, but are not limited to, sensor type, image resolution, cloud cover or limitations of the flood polygon extraction method. In this layer, where possible, a symbology is applied to the flood polygons based on the underlying land use classification, or is simply unclassified and shows the raw flood extent. When using Web mapping services, to display a specific product, filter by date (UTC Date) and area of interest (AOI). Also, a link to download each product directly from the FTP site is available in the Resources section. This prepackaged and compressed product contains a Shape file, a PDF file and a KMZ file. Disclaimer: Emergency response authorities are the primary users of these satellite-derived open water flood extent map products. These products are generated to provide analysis and emergency response situational awareness and to facilitate decision-making during major flood events. The open water flood extent products are generated rapidly and limited time is available for editing and validation. The flood products reflect the open water flood conditions at the date/time of acquisition. While efforts are made to produce high quality products, near-real time products may contain errors due to the limited time available for vector editing and validation. Please note that current algorithms do not map flooded areas under the forest canopy and are not optimized for urban flood mapping. Limitation of Liability: Accordingly, the information contained on this website is provided on an “as is” basis and Natural Resources Canada makes no representations or warranties respecting the information, either expressed or implied, arising by law or otherwise, including but not limited to, effectiveness, completeness, accuracy or fitness for a particular purpose. Natural Resources Canada does not assume any liability in respect of any damage or loss based on the use of this website. In no event shall Natural Resources Canada be liable in any way for any direct, indirect, special, incidental, consequential, or other damages based on any use of this website or any other website to which this site is linked, including, without limitation, any lost profits or revenue or business interruption. Parent Collection:- Floods in Canada - Cartographic Product Collection
View Active Floods in Canada for more information, formats, contacts and metadata.

Layers
Natural Events in Canada - Earthquakes 2012
Natural Events in Canada - Forest Fires 2010
Natural Events in Canada - Floods 2006-2011
Natural Events in Canada - Storms 2006-2011

Canadian Wetland Inventory Progress Map 

AAFC Infrastructure Flood Mapping in Saskatchewan 20 centimeter colour orthophotos  (Updated 10/14/2020) Description
The AAFC Infrastructure Flood Mapping in Saskatchewan 20 centimeter colour orthophotos is a collection of georeferenced color digital orthophotos with 20 cm pixel size. The imagery was delivered in GeoTIF and ECW formats. The TIF and ECW mosaics were delivered in the same 1 km x 1 km tiles as the LiDAR data, and complete mosaics for each area in MrSID format were also provided. The digital photos were orthorectified using the ground model created from the DTM Key Points. With orthorectification, only features on the surface of the ground are correctly positioned in the orthophotos. Objects above the surface of the ground, such as building rooftops and trees, may contain horizontal displacement due to image parallax experienced when the photos were captured. This is sometimes apparent along the cut lines between photos. For positioning of above-ground structures it is recommended to use the LiDAR point clouds for accurate horizontal placement.

Wild Fire in Saskatchewan (Updated 12/15/2020) probably we not need that just put it here for interest

Air Quality in Saskatchewan (Updated 1/07/2020) 

Straight forward pretty much!

Layers
Air Quality - Continuous Monitors
Air Quality - Wet Deposition Monitors
Air Quality - Air Zones

Land Cover for Agricultural Regions of Canada (Updated 10/2/2020)

Layers
Land Cover for Agricultural Regions of Canada, circa 2000

Water Quality at Monitoring Stations Canada

Description
The Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators (CESI) program provides data and information to track Canada's performance on key environmental sustainability issues. The Water quantity in Canadian rivers indicators provide information about the state of the amount of surface water in Canada and its change through time to support water resource management. They are used to provide information about the state and trends in water quantity in Canada. Information is provided to Canadians in a number of formats including: static and interactive maps, charts and graphs, HTML and CSV data tables and downloadable reports. See the supplementary documentation for the data sources and details on how the data were collected and how the indicator was calculated.  See Local Water quantity in Canadian rivers - Water quantity at monitoring stations, Canada for more information on data formats, interactive indicator map, web services, and contact information.

Canadian Drought Monitor (2002 - 2020) 

Description
The Canadian Drought Monitor (CDM) brings together Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s drought monitoring capabilities and collaboration with external agencies (federal and provincial) to produce, through analysis and consolidation of multiple indices and indicators, an easily understood comprehensive national drought severity map and report each month. The monitor provides specific details on agricultural impacts of the current drought situation, including statistics on land area, cattle, and the number of producers impacted. 

The Canadian Drought Monitors are based on a five class system ranking the severity of the drought condition. The Monitor map identifies general drought areas, labelling droughts by intensity, with D1 being the least intense and D4 being the most intense. The classifications are as follows:

•    D0 (Abnormally Dry) – represents an event that occurs once every 3-5 years;

•    D1 (Moderate Drought) – represents an event that occurs every 5-10 years;

•    D2 (Severe Drought) – represents an event that occurs every 10-20 years;

•    D3 (Extreme Drought) – represents an event that occurs every 20-25 years; and

•    D4 (Exceptional Drought) – represents an event that occurs every 50 years.

D0 is not recognized as a drought classification; however, it provides a warning of areas that are currently vulnerable to drought or areas that are recovering from drought.

Canadian and U.S. Drought Monitor (Updated 11/13/2020)

Description
Feature layers showing areas of drought as reported by the Canadian Drought Monitor and the United States Drought Monitor. Polygons show drought intensity and points show drought impact.  

Layers
Canadian and U.S. Drought Monitor - Drought_Intensity
Canadian and U.S. Drought Monitor - Drought_Impact

Climate Moisture Index for Canada - Short-term (2011-2040) under RCP 8.5

Description
Drought is a deficiency in precipitation over an extended period, usually a season or more, resulting in a water shortage that has adverse impacts on vegetation, animals and/or people. The Climate Moisture Index (CMI) was calculated as the difference between annual precipitation and potential evapotranspiration (PET) - the potential loss of water vapour from a landscape covered by vegetation. Positive CMI values indicate wet or moist conditions and show that precipitation is sufficient to sustain a closed-canopy forest. Negative CMI values indicate dry conditions that, at best, can support discontinuous parkland-type forests. The CMI is well suited to evaluating moisture conditions in dry regions such as the Prairie Provinces and has been used for other ecological studies. Mean annual potential evapotranspiration (PET) was estimated for 30-year periods using the modified Penman-Monteith formulation of Hogg (1997), based on monthly 10-km gridded temperature data. Data shown on maps are 30-year averages. Historical values of CMI (1981-2010) were created by averaging annual CMI calculated from interpolated monthly temperature and precipitation data produced from climate station records. Future values of CMI were projected from downscaled monthly values of temperature and precipitation simulated using the Canadian Earth System Model version 2 (CanESM2) for multiple RCP radiative forcing scenarios. Provided layer: Climate moisture index (CMI) - Future projections using RCP 8.5 for 2011-2040. Reference: Hogg, E.H. 1997. Temporal scaling of moisture and the forest-grassland boundary in western Canada. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 84,115-122.

North America Surface Water Values 

Description
The North America Surface Water Values point dataset contains the current water level and stream flow values as recorded by Canadian and USA hydrometric gauging station locations. Daily values are recorded as well as comparisons with historical measurements, including difference in values from the previous day, the mean level for that calendar date, the annual mean water level, and maximum and minimum recorded levels. Percentile values based on historical average for the current day for both water level and stream flow are also included. Real-time gauging station data for Canada is available here: https://wateroffice.ec.gc.ca/search/statistics_e.html Historical gauging station data for Canada is available here: https://wateroffice.ec.gc.ca/search/historical_e.html Real-time gauging station data for the United States is available here: https://waterservices.usgs.gov/rest/Statistics-Service.html Historical gauging station data for the United States is available here: https://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/inventory / L'ensemble de données ponctuelles des valeurs relatives aux eaux de surface en Amérique du Nord comprend les valeurs actuelles de niveau d'eau et de débit des cours d'eau enregistrées par les stations hydrométriques canadiennes et américaines. Les valeurs quotidiennes sont enregistrés, de même que les comparaisons aux mesures historiques, y compris les différences avec les valeurs de la journée précédente, le niveau moyen de la date calendaire, le niveau d'eau moyen annuel et les niveaux maximums et minimums enregistrés. Les valeurs en pourcentage fondées sur la moyenne historique pour la journée en cours des niveaux d'eau et du débit des cours d'eau sont également incluses. Les données en temps réel des stations hydrométriques pour le Canada peuvent être consultées ici : https://wateroffice.ec.gc.ca/search/statistics_f.html Les données historiques des stations hydrométriques pour le Canada peuvent être consultées ici : https://wateroffice.ec.gc.ca/search/historical_f.html Les données en temps réel des stations hydrométriques pour les États-Unis peuvent être consultées ici : https://waterservices.usgs.gov/rest/Statistics-Service.html Les données historiques des stations hydrométriques pour les États-Unis peuvent être consultées ici : https://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/inventory

Climate Change Projects (Updated 12/16/2019) 

Description

Data describing clean growth and climate change projects that have received federal funding since 2015 that feeds into the Climate Action Map. The data include projects that meet Mitigation, Adaptation and Clean Technology objectives. The data include project names and descriptions, funding information, locations, and recipients.

Annual area burned by large fires (>200 hectares) - Short-term (2011-2040) under RCP 8.5

Description

The fire regime describes the patterns of fire seasonality, frequency, size, spatial continuity, intensity, type (e.g., crown or surface fire) and severity in a particular area or ecosystem. Annual area burned is the average surface area burned annually in Canada by large fires (greater than 200 hectares (ha)). Changes in annual area burned were estimated using Homogeneous Fire Regime (HFR) zones. These zones represent areas where the fire regime is similar over a broad spatial scale (Boulanger et al. 2014). Such zonation is useful in identifying areas with unusual fire regimes that would have been overlooked if fires had been aggregated according to administrative and/or ecological classifications. Fire data comes from the Canadian National Fire Database covering 1959-1999 (for HFR zones building) and 1959-1995 (for model building). Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) modeling was used to relate monthly fire regime attributes with monthly climatic/fire-weather in each HFR zone. Future climatic data were simulated using the Canadian Earth System Model version 2 (CanESM2) and downscaled at a 10 Km resolution using ANUSPLIN for two different Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP). RCPs are different greenhouse gas concentration trajectories adopted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) for its fifth Assessment Report. RCP 2.6 (referred to as rapid emissions reductions) assumes that greenhouse gas concentrations peak between 2010-2020, with emissions declining thereafter. In the RCP 8.5 scenario (referred to as continued emissions increases) greenhouse gas concentrations continue to rise throughout the 21st century. Provided layer: projected annual area burned by large fires (>200 ha) across Canada for the short-term (2011-2040) under the RCP 8.5 (continued emissions increases). Reference: Boulanger, Y., Gauthier, S., et al. 2014. A refinement of models projecting future Canadian fire regimes using homogeneous fire regime zones. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 44, 365-376.

Water Balance 

Description
Click anywhere on earth to see how the water balance is changing over time. This app is based on data from GLDAS version 2.1, which uses weather observations like temperature, humidity, and rainfall to run the Noah land surface model. This model estimates how much of the rain becomes runoff, how much evaporates, and how much infiltrates into the soil. These output variables, calculated every three hours, are aggregated into monthly averages, giving us a record of the hydrologic cycle going all the way back to January 2000. 

Because the model is run with 0.25 degree spatial resolution (~30 km), these data should only be used for regional analysis. A specific farm or other small area might experience very different conditions than the region around it, especially because human influences like irrigation are not included.